Interior Design by Verner Panton

March 31st, 2015 | Space

Verner Panton 6Verner Panton 1Verner Panton 4Verner Panton 2Verner Panton 5

Verner Panton 7

The Danish designer, Verner Panton (1926–1998), brought the future to 1960’s and 1970’s interior design. His signature work, Visiona 2, was a fantasy landscape constructed for the 1970 Furniture Fair in Cologne, Germany. The undulating organic forms, made from bright glossy materials, captured the imagination of a free-thinking society. Houses didn’t need separate rooms with individual furniture anymore. Instead, you could lounge on almost any surface.

A word from the Vitra Design Museum:

“Visiona 2 was entirely focused on the question of living in the world of tomorrow. It broke the traditional understanding of space with its clear ascription of functions, instead creating surroundings that were dedicated to well being, communication, and relaxation. For this, Panton designed numerous design objects, including furniture, textiles, lighting, wall and ceiling coverings that formed in highly imaginative arrangements a series of very different spaces. As an integrative component, he developed both a lighting concept and atmospheric sounds for the individual spaces, like the song of a nightingale, the cry of an owl, bee humming, cat howls, or waves.”

Wild…

You can find more images and information here.

-RSB

Rockets of the World by Tyler Skrabek

March 13th, 2015 | Space

Rockets of the World Taylor Skrabek

(Click on the photo to enlarge)

“Rockets of the World” is an infographic made by Tyler Skrabek. The poster includes the Payload to Low Earth Orbit as well as the number of successful and unsuccessful launches. It’s an updated design based off an old illustration made by Peter Alway back in 1995:

Rockets of the World - Peter Alway

 (Click on the photo to enlarge)

It’s pretty cool to see the diversity of designs, but for the most part, all of them are phallic tubes, a necessity to burst through the Earth’s atmosphere.

Via Reddit:

Of course, the illustration doesn’t show all of humanity’s rockets. “Just to keep things tidy I choose not to include rockets that haven’t flown yet on the off-chance they don’t actually make it off the ground. But rest assured there will be a version that includes the Falcon 9 Heavy as soon as it does.”

I’m also pretty amazed to see just how big the Saturn V rocket was compared to the competition!

You can pick up one of Tyler’s prints here, and you can check out Peter Alway’s book here: Rockets of the World.

-RSB

Digital Gross Anatomy by Alexey Kashpersky

March 11th, 2015 | Brain

Digital Gross Anatomy Alexey Kashpersky 1

Alexey Kashpersky is a Ukrainian artist who created these impressive digital gross anatomy specimens using the program, ZBrush, along with a few other graphics tools. Many of the cadaver images were designed from real anatomical photographs, thus explaining the level of detail Alexey was able to achieve.

Digital Gross Anatomy Alexey Kashpersky 2 Digital Gross Anatomy Alexey Kashpersky 3 Gross Anatomy Alexey Kashpersky 4 Digital Gross Anatomy Alexey Kashpersky 5

I think it would be great if medical students were given access to 3D Cadavers for learning purposes. I know this has been tried before, but not at this level of anatomical detail. I’m also imagining a great application for Oculus Rift technology… Maybe surgeons could even go through mock surgeries to prepare for real cases.

For more from Alexey Kashpersky, check out his site.

-RSB

The Clock by Gislain Benoit

February 27th, 2015 | Robot

The Clock Gislain Benoit 5

“The Clock” is the culmination of a 3-year project by Gislain Benoit. It’s made up of 1,916 hand-soldered components and weighs about 14 lbs. Of course, the end result is something that can be accomplished by a $10 digital watch found at your local convenient store, but the beauty is in the details. The clock looks like it could be some sort of mini hadron collider.

The Clock Gislain Benoit 1

The Clock Gislain Benoit 2

How it Works:

“The clock reference, in other words the heart beat of this clock comes from the AC outlet. Here in North America, the outlets supply 120 Volts, in 60 cycles per second, called 60 Hertz. This 60 Hertz signal is taken by the clock and is divided by sixty to produce a pulse of 1 hertz, which is one pulse per second. The same circuit which does this division is also used to animate the ring of LED lights around the clock digits. The 1 Hertz pulse is then taken to the seconds counter, then to the tens of seconds counter, then to the minutes, and so on, till the tens of the hours.”

The Clock Gislain Benoit 3

The Clock Gislain Benoit 4

I wonder if he was inspired by Leonardo Ulian?

For more, check out Gislain’s site.

-RSB

Spot – A Robot Dog that Can Take a Kick

February 10th, 2015 | Robot

boston dynamics robot dog spot

Boston Dynamics, previously featured here, is a Google-owned robotics company that just released a new design — Spot, the Robot Dog.

From Boston Dynamics:

“Spot is a four-legged robot designed for indoor and outdoor operation. It is electrically powered and hydraulically actuated. Spot has a sensor head that helps it navigate and negotiate rough terrain. Spot weighs about 160 lbs.”

I actually started to feel some empathy for Spot when he was being kicked by the engineer. It responded in such an organic way… rapidly gaining its balance and then pausing for a moment to digest the assault.

The applications for these machines are seemingly endless. They can carry supplies into dangerous environments (i.e. helping soldiers move equipment), assist the disabled with chores, or simply be a man’s new robot best friend. Exciting times ahead…

-RSB

[via NPR]

“Riding Light” – Animation by Alphonse Swinehart

February 5th, 2015 | Space

Riding Light Vimeo

“Riding Light” is a new, beautiful animation by Alphonse Swinehart. In the 45-minute journey, you will travel with light on its way from the Sun to Jupiter. I love videos like this because they really help me gain a better appreciation for the scale of our Universe. If you watch light travel from Earth to Mars, for example, you will realize how difficult it will be to successfully complete a manned exploration mission to the red planet. There’s just so much emptiness between the planetary masses…

A word from the creators:

“In our terrestrial view of things, the speed of light seems incredibly fast. But as soon as you view it against the vast distances of the universe, it’s unfortunately very slow. This animation illustrates, in realtime, the journey of a photon of light emitted from the surface of the sun and traveling across a portion of the solar system, from a human perspective.

I’ve taken liberties with certain things like the alignment of planets and asteroids, as well as ignoring the laws of relativity concerning what a photon actually “sees” or how time is experienced at the speed of light, but overall I’ve kept the size and distances of all the objects as accurate as possible. I also decided to end the animation just past Jupiter as I wanted to keep the running length below an hour.

Design & Animation: Alphonse Swinehart / aswinehart.com
Music: Steve Reich “Music for 18 Musicians”
Performed by: Eighth Blackbird / eighthblackbird.org

-RSB

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