Tag Archives: Paint

UV Paint, a Wind Tunnel, and a Ferrari

October 28th, 2014 | Robot

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We’ve featured Fabian Oefner’s work here on the blog before. He’s a photographer, videographer and a self-proclaimed “curious investigator, photographer and artist, whose work moves between the fields of art and science.” We can certainly appreciate that sentiment at RobotSpaceBrain. His new collaboration with Ferrari is another wonderful fusion of art and science.

Wind tunnels are often used in aerodynamic research to study the effects of air moving past solid objects. In the automobile industry, the tunnel can be used to measure the aerodynamic forces and pressure distribution to optimize a car’s design. In this project, Fabian sprays UV paint into the wind tunnel with a black California T Ferrari and captures the scene in it all its glory.

The artwork is certainly commercial, but I appreciate it just the same. After all, artists have to make money too…

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You can find more from Fabian, at his website.

-RSB

Into Abstraction with Mark Lovejoy

September 6th, 2013 | Brain

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Mark Lovejoy created these beautifully abstract photographs using a collection of materials found in his art studio (see below). The images are full of color and depth, each expressing its own mood.

The work is extremely reminiscent of David Lidbetter, who we featured on the site back in May.

Here’s a word from the artist:

“These are not photographs of paintings – no paintings exist.  These images are of something as fleeting as any street scene or sunset – illuminated pigments, diluents, extenders, resins, oils, fillers, waxes, drying agents, etc. which, depending upon the mix, have varying miscibilities, viscosities, tacks, surface textures, reflectance, drying times etc., etc.  All images are made using CMYK, white & in some cases silver & gold.  Each original image has been reworked & reshot repeatedly – preserving any given iteration would be to doom all subsequent possibilities – the photographic record is all that remains . . . “

Another Friday filled with color. Find more from Mark Lovejoy at his Tumblr.

-RSB

Explosion of Color – Photography from David Lidbetter

May 17th, 2013 | Robot

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David Lidbetter is a London-based photographer with a prediliction for wild texture and color. He works with a variety of materials — yarn, crayons, paint, rubber bands, and food — to create pieces that are incredibly fun to look at.   The photographs above look like he just built a paint bomb and dropped it on the canvas. In reality, however, these scenes are carefully composed.

This is the kind of art that I like to look at on Fridays…

For more from the artist, check out his site.

-RSB

Black Hole Photography from Fabian Oefner

March 10th, 2013 | Space

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Black Hole Photography

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Fabian Oefner, from Switzerland, created these Black Hole photographs using centrifugal force, which basically means he spins a drill really really fast and photographs paint flying off the edges.

Here’s a quote from the artist about the process:

“Various shades of acrylic paint are dripped onto a metallic rod, which is connected to a drill. When switched on, the paint starts to move away from the rod due to the centrifugal force, creating these amazing looking structures.

The motion of the paint happens in a blink of an eye, the images you see are taken only millisecond after the drill was turned on. To capture the moment, where the paint forms that distinctive shape, I connected a sensor to the drill, which sends an impulse to the flashes. These specialized units are capable of creating flashes as short as a 1/40000 of a second, freezing the motion of the paint.”

It’s a really interesting technique that requires incredible timing.  I especially like the oblique angle shots, amazing expression and color!  For more information, visit Fabian’s Behance page.

-RSB

[via Colossal]