Category Archives: Space

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Sable Cinétique Table by Adrien M / Claire B

April 20th, 2015 | Space

Sable Cinétique Table by Adrien M : Claire B

Adrien M / Claire B is an art duo from Lyon, France. They’re known for their incredible digital performance pieces that often combine theater, dance, and technology. The Sable Cinétique, which translates to “kinetic sand,” is a fascinating demonstration of the Ecran 4K flat screen, displaying particle attractor physics. The reflections on the glass juggling ball makes the video look pretty magical.

This is simply a work-in-progress. The final version will be presented at the Palais de la Découverte, a science museum in Paris, on June 8th, 2015.

-RSB

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Interior Design by Verner Panton

March 31st, 2015 | Space

Verner Panton 6Verner Panton 1Verner Panton 4Verner Panton 2Verner Panton 5

Verner Panton 7

The Danish designer, Verner Panton (1926–1998), brought the future to 1960’s and 1970’s interior design. His signature work, Visiona 2, was a fantasy landscape constructed for the 1970 Furniture Fair in Cologne, Germany. The undulating organic forms, made from bright glossy materials, captured the imagination of a free-thinking society. Houses didn’t need separate rooms with individual furniture anymore. Instead, you could lounge on almost any surface.

A word from the Vitra Design Museum:

“Visiona 2 was entirely focused on the question of living in the world of tomorrow. It broke the traditional understanding of space with its clear ascription of functions, instead creating surroundings that were dedicated to well being, communication, and relaxation. For this, Panton designed numerous design objects, including furniture, textiles, lighting, wall and ceiling coverings that formed in highly imaginative arrangements a series of very different spaces. As an integrative component, he developed both a lighting concept and atmospheric sounds for the individual spaces, like the song of a nightingale, the cry of an owl, bee humming, cat howls, or waves.”

Wild…

You can find more images and information here.

-RSB

Rockets of the World by Tyler Skrabek

March 13th, 2015 | Space

Rockets of the World Taylor Skrabek

(Click on the photo to enlarge)

“Rockets of the World” is an infographic made by Tyler Skrabek. The poster includes the Payload to Low Earth Orbit as well as the number of successful and unsuccessful launches. It’s an updated design based off an old illustration made by Peter Alway back in 1995:

Rockets of the World - Peter Alway

 (Click on the photo to enlarge)

It’s pretty cool to see the diversity of designs, but for the most part, all of them are phallic tubes, a necessity to burst through the Earth’s atmosphere.

Via Reddit:

Of course, the illustration doesn’t show all of humanity’s rockets. “Just to keep things tidy I choose not to include rockets that haven’t flown yet on the off-chance they don’t actually make it off the ground. But rest assured there will be a version that includes the Falcon 9 Heavy as soon as it does.”

I’m also pretty amazed to see just how big the Saturn V rocket was compared to the competition!

You can pick up one of Tyler’s prints here, and you can check out Peter Alway’s book here: Rockets of the World.

-RSB

“Riding Light” – Animation by Alphonse Swinehart

February 5th, 2015 | Space

Riding Light Vimeo

“Riding Light” is a new, beautiful animation by Alphonse Swinehart. In the 45-minute journey, you will travel with light on its way from the Sun to Jupiter. I love videos like this because they really help me gain a better appreciation for the scale of our Universe. If you watch light travel from Earth to Mars, for example, you will realize how difficult it will be to successfully complete a manned exploration mission to the red planet. There’s just so much emptiness between the planetary masses…

A word from the creators:

“In our terrestrial view of things, the speed of light seems incredibly fast. But as soon as you view it against the vast distances of the universe, it’s unfortunately very slow. This animation illustrates, in realtime, the journey of a photon of light emitted from the surface of the sun and traveling across a portion of the solar system, from a human perspective.

I’ve taken liberties with certain things like the alignment of planets and asteroids, as well as ignoring the laws of relativity concerning what a photon actually “sees” or how time is experienced at the speed of light, but overall I’ve kept the size and distances of all the objects as accurate as possible. I also decided to end the animation just past Jupiter as I wanted to keep the running length below an hour.

Design & Animation: Alphonse Swinehart / aswinehart.com
Music: Steve Reich “Music for 18 Musicians”
Performed by: Eighth Blackbird / eighthblackbird.org

-RSB

Photography from Todd Baxter

January 29th, 2015 | Space

Todd Baxter 1

Todd Baxter 2

Todd Baxter 7

Todd Baxter photography 3

Todd Baxter 4

Todd Baxter 5

Todd Baxter 6

Todd Baxter, hailing from Chicago, Illinois, is responsible for these dreamy conceptual photographs. Often featuring children in surreal environments, Todd captures a certain intensity with his images. I think his portraits are especially strong… no smiles or laughter to be found here.

Find more from Todd at his Portfolio Site.

-RSB

Philae Spacecraft Lands on a Comet

November 13th, 2014 | Space
Philae Spacecraft Lands on Comet

The first image taken from the Philae Spacecraft on the surface of the comet

The European Space Agency succeeded in putting a spacecraft on the surface of a comet yesterday! This is a wonderful achievement for mankind! The robotic probe, Philae, reached 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (what a name?!) on the back of the Rosetta satellite on a 10-year, 6.4 billion-km journey. The descent to the surface took approximately 7 hours, and it wasn’t without its fair share of suspense. The 2 harpoons which were meant to stabilize the probe failed to launch, and the spacecraft actually bounced a few times on the surface before reaching its final resting place.

Philae Landing Zone

The main problem with the current position is that the lander is suffering from a lack of sunlight to power all of its tools. Philae is only receiving about 1.5 hours of illumination during every 12-hour rotation of the comet (much less than the agency had hoped for). The Europeans would love to power up Philae’s on-board drill and analyze the comet’s composition, but at the moment, they are worried that the drill’s rotational forces will destablize the probe and send it off into space. Regardless of future plans, this is already a tremendous achievement. Any time you accomplish something that has never happened in the history of humanity, I’d say it was success!

Why did they attempt this mission?

Many scientists believe that comets brought organic molecules to Earth, helping give rise to our oceans and atmosphere, and maybe even the seeds of life. So, learning more about comets’ materials in space could help us discover how life began at home.

A little known fact is that here at RobotSpaceBrain, we actually launched a manned-mission to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko around the same time, and we are HAPPY TO REPORT, THE MISSION WAS A RESOUNDING SUCCESS! We even stuck the landing:

:) Needless to say, this is one of those really exciting moments in space exploration!

-RSB

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